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Pain Activity Diary

Activity diaries are a crucial information-gathering tool. They can be used for activity monitoring during an assessment phase of therapy, symptom monitoring during therapy, correlating activity with symptoms, or activity scheduling as part of behavioral activation. This Pain – Activity Diary includes spaces to record activity for 1 hour time slots throughout the day as well as space to record levels of pain.

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A PDF of the resource, theoretical background, suggested therapist questions and prompts.

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A PDF of the resource plus client-friendly instructions where appropriate.

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An editable Microsoft PowerPoint version of the resource.

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Languages this resource is available in

  • Danish
  • Dutch
  • English (GB)
  • English (US)
  • French
  • German
  • Greek
  • Indonesian
  • Italian
  • Malaysian
  • Portuguese (European)
  • Romanian
  • Spanish (International)
  • Uzbek

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Introduction & Theoretical Background

Activity diaries are a crucial information-gathering tool. They can be used for activity monitoring during an assessment phase of therapy, symptom monitoring during therapy, correlating activity with symptoms, or activity scheduling as part of behavioural activation. This Pain Activity Diary includes spaces to record activity for 1 hour time slots throughout the day as well as space to record levels of pain.

Therapist Guidance

For activity monitoring clients should be instructed to record their activity in the 1 hour time slots throughout the day, and to record their associated level of pain for each time period. 

For activity scheduling clients should be instructed to plan and schedule desired activities in advance, and to record whether the scheduled activities were completed, and to record their associated level of pain.

References And Further Reading

  • Beck, A.T., Rush, A.J., Shaw, B.F., & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression. New York: Guilford.