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Psychology Tools For Living Well

Cognitive behavioral therapy can help your clients to live happier and more fulfilling lives. Psychology Tools for Living Well is a self-help course that aims to teach the principles and practice of cognitive behavioral therapy.

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Psychology Tools For Living Well (All Chapters)

Chapter 1: An Introduction To CBT

Chapter 2: A Guide To Emotions

Chapter 3: Thoughts In CBT

Chapter 4: Putting It All Together

Chapter 5: What's Next?

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Languages this resource is available in

  • English (GB)
  • English (US)

Problems this resource might be used to address

Introduction & Theoretical Background

Cognitive behavioral therapy can help your clients to live happier and more fulfilling lives. Psychology Tools for Living Well is a self-help course that teaches the principles and practice of cognitive behavioral therapy. Readers are guided through chapters which introduce:
  • the basic principles of CBT,
  • the role of emotions,
  • how thoughts and behaviors affect our mood,
  • and how these components come together in ways that can leave us feeling stuck.
During each section clients are guided through practical exercises to consolidate what they have learned, and to hone their skills in practicing CBT techniques. This course is equally suitable as a self-help guide, or as an adjunct to face-to-face work for clients in therapy.

Therapist Guidance

This is a Psychology Tools workbook. Suggested uses include:
  • Client handout – use as a psychoeducation and skills-development resource
  • Discussion point – use to provoke a discussion and explore client beliefs
  • Therapist learning tool – improve your familiarity with a psychological construct
  • Teaching resource – use as a learning tool during training

References And Further Reading

  • Blackledge, J. T., & Hayes, S. C. (2001). Emotion regulation in acceptance and commitment therapy. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 57(2), 243–255.
  • Hoffman, S. G., Asnaani, A., Vonk, I. J. J., Sawyer, A. T., & Fang, A. (2012). The efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy: a review of meta-analyses. Cognitive Therapy Research, 36, 427-440.
  • Kahneman, D., & Egan, P. (2011). Thinking, fast and slow (Vol. 1). New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
  • Koenig, J. The dictionary of obscure sorrows. Retrieved from http://www.dictionaryofobscuresorrows.com/.
  • Padesky, C. A. (1990). Schema as self-prejudice. International Cognitive Therapy Newsletter, 6(1), 6-7.
  • Watts, S. E., Turnell, A., Kladnitski, N., Newby, J. M., & Andrews, G. (2015). Treatment-as-usual (TAU) is anything but usual: A meta-analysis of CBT versus TAU for anxiety and depression. Journal of Affective Disorders, 175, 152-167.
  • Yudkowski, E. Fundamental question of rationality. Retrieved from: https://wiki.lesswrong.com/wiki/Fundamental_Question_of_Rationality