Skip to main content

Psychology Tools For Mindfulness Audio Collection

Audio Collection

The Psychology Tools For Mindfulness Audio Collection is the perfect way to introduce your clients to the practice of mindfulness. Developed by a clinical psychologist and qualified mindfulness teacher, the audio collection contains a sequence of over one and a half hours of mindfulness exercises that can help your clients to develop an effective mindfulness practice. The audio exercises in this collection can be used during clinical sessions, or prescribed as self-practice to complement clinical work and to develop a client’s personal practice.

Psychology Tools For Mindfulness Audio Collection Raisin Exercise - Mindfulness Exercise Thinking Versus Sensing - Mindfulness Exercise Body Scan - Mindfulness Exercise Mindfulness Of Breath (Short Version) - Mindfulness Exercise Mindfulness Of Breath (Long Version) - Mindfulness Exercise Mindfulness Of Sounds And Thoughts - Mindfulness Exercise Being With Difficulty - Mindfulness Exercise Mindfulness In Everyday Life - Mindfulness Exercise

Downloads

ZIP

Audio collection

ZIP
PDF

Audio script

PDF

Description

Mindfulness-based programs such as mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT: Segal, Williams & Teasdale, 2013) and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR: Kabat-Zinn, 1990) have demonstrated beneficial effects for a wide range of psychological disorders, as well as helping people to cope with pain and illness (Goink et al, 2015; Khoury et al, 2013). Mindful awareness exercises form part of treatment approaches such as dialectical behavior therapy (DBT: Linehan, 1993) and compassion focused therapy (CFT: Gilbert, 2014) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy?? (ref)

The Psychology Tools For Mindfulness Audio Collection is a guided introduction to the practice of mindfulness meditation. Developed by a clinical psychologist and qualified mindfulness teacher, the audio collection contains a sequence of over one and a half hours of mindfulness exercises that will help your clients to develop an effective mindfulness practice. The audio exercises in this collection can be used during clinical sessions, or prescribed as self-practice to complement clinical work and to develop a client’s personal practice.

The audio collection contains an introduction and eight exercises:

  1. Introduction. A general introduction to the why and how of mindfulness.
  2. Raisin exercise. An exercise encouraging present-moment awareness of the senses.
  3. Thinking versus sensing. An exercise drawing attention to the differences between ‘thinking about’ and ‘sensing’ experiences directly.
  4. Body scan. An exercise encouraging present-moment awareness, using the body as an anchor for your attention, encouraging you to experience body sensations directly vs thinking about them .
  5. Mindfulness of breath (short version). A short (5 minute) exercise encouraging present-moment awareness using the breath as an anchor, to help focus the mind.
  6. Mindfulness of breath (long version). A longer (10 minute) exercise encouraging present-moment awareness using the breath as an anchor. The extended duration allows for a wider range of experiences to be noticed such as mind wandering, boredom or frustration.
  7. Mindfulness of sounds and thoughts. A practice to encourage observing sounds and thoughts as mere phenomenon. The exercise uses the metaphor of the self as a microphone, that simply observes thoughts and sounds as they come and go.
  8. Being with difficulty. A gentle introduction to bringing present-moment awareness to bear upon thoughts or feelings that are more difficult or distressing.
  9. Mindfulness in everyday life. A short exercise to guide clients to how to bring present-moment awareness into everyday life.

Each exercise in the Psychology Tools for Mindfulness Audio Collection is available in two versions, and the tracks within the collection are organised into two ‘discs’:

  • Just Learning. The Just Learning disc contains a general introduction to mindfulness, and then an introduction and instructions for each exercise. This is the best way of understanding why and how each exercise should be attempted.
  • Quick Access. Versions of the exercises on the Quick Access disc have no introduction and just segue straight into the exercise. This is perfect for clients who are familiar with the techniques and just want to be guided through an exercise at the right time.

This download also contains a document including the verbatim script for each exercise. This allows clinicians to guide the exercises ‘live’ in session, or to record personalized versions for clients in their own voice to reinforce work completed in therapy.

Instructions

This audio collection is designed for anyone who would like to develop their own mindfulness meditation practice. No previous experience with mindfulness is necessary on the part of the client, although best practice is for clinicians to be familiar with mindfulness. In common with other psychological interventions, mindfulness exercises result in clients confronting difficult and potentially distressing thoughts, emotions, and sensations and so care should be taken when prescribing them (Baer et al, 2019).

The audio exercises can be used in session, or prescribed as self-practice to complement clinical work and to develop a client’s mindfulness practice.

This audio collection contains multiple .mp3 files. It is downloaded as a .zip file which will need to be unzipped before the audio files can be accessed. Once unzipped, the audio files can be played in most media player apps. 

References

  • Baer, R. A. (2003). Mindfulness training as a clinical intervention: A conceptual and empirical review. Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 10(2), 125-143.
  • Baer, R., Crane, C., Miller, E., & Kuyken, W. (2019). Doing no harm in mindfulness-based programs: conceptual issues and empirical findings. Clinical Psychology Review, 71, 101-114.
  • Brown, K. W., & Ryan, R. M. (2003). The benefits of being present: mindfulness and its role in psychological well-being. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84(4), 822.
  • Gilbert, P. (2014). The origins and nature of compassion focused therapy. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 53(1), 6-41.
  • Gotink, R. A., Chu, P., Busschbach, J. J., Benson, H., Fricchione, G. L., & Hunink, M. M. (2015). Standardised mindfulness-based interventions in healthcare: an overview of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of RCTs. PloS one, 10(4), e0124344.
  • Kabat-Zinn, J., & Hanh, T. N. (2009). Full catastrophe living: Using the wisdom of your body and mind to face stress, pain, and illness. Delta.
  • Khoury, B., Lecomte, T., Fortin, G., Masse, M., Therien, P., Bouchard, V., … & Hofmann, S. G. (2013). Mindfulness-based therapy: a comprehensive meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 33(6), 763-771.
  • Linehan, M. (1993). Cognitive-behavioral treatment of borderline personality disorder. New York: Guilford.
  • Segal, Z. V., & Teasdale, J. (2018). Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy for depression. Guilford Publications.