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Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)

Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) is a short-term psychological (talking) therapy. Its foundations lie in attachment theory (Bowlby, 1969), communication theory (e.g., Kiesler, 1996), and social theory (e.g., Henderson, Byrne, Duncan-Jones, 1982). IPT therapists pay particular attention to their clients’ relationships with other people. The IPT model says that we can change how we feel by improving our network of relationships with other people. Read more
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References

  • Bowlby, J. (1969). Attachment and loss: Volume I. Attachment. London: The Tavistock Institute of Human Relations.
  • Henderson, S., Byrne, D. G., & Duncan-Jones, P. (1982). Neurosis and the social environment. Sydney, Australia: Academic Press.
  • Kiesler, D. J. (1996). Contemporary interpersonal theory and research: Personality, psychopathology, and psychotherapy. New York: Wiley.